The lightness of racism; the vice of creativity

So the mistress of racist brain farts Amy Cheong gets let off with a “stern” police warning, having fled our shores for her homeland Australia. She offered an apology but not for her racism, which she claims to be innocent of, this despite her remarks about Malays being cheap, holding noisy weddings or having high divorce rates. She just “regrets her post”. Racism? We all need racism so we can let off a little stress from work, right? Cool kids in school crack racist jokes, don’t they?

Meanwhile, creativity is not to be tolerated. At least not the type that involves stickers in public. Sticker Lady (Samantha Lo) will be charged in court on Tuesday for no less than 15 charges of mischief for bringing smiles and laughter to Singaporeans through a creative display of stickers and road markings. I personally laughed out loud at one particular “Press once can already” sticker and deliberately hit the button a second time – condemnably antisocial behaviour.

First this, then anarchy. THEN bar-top dancing, which we all know causes death.

It wasn’t reduced to “Miscellaneous offences”, as many had urged the G to do, but at least it wasn’t “Vandalism”, which Law maven Jothie Rajah had earlier revealed to have been reserved for the most vile sort of criminal – politicians with stickers and spray paint. Sticker Lady and her accomplice had not included any political content in their work.

Never mind that enterprising locksmiths, website owners, tuition teachers and rent-seeking home-owners have been sticker-ing their way across Singapore for decades with their corporate drivel. We must make an example of those who seek no financial gain. Greed is good. Fun will not go unpunished.

Yay, justice.

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14 thoughts on “The lightness of racism; the vice of creativity

  1. Daily SG: 26 Mar 2013 | The Singapore Daily

  2. Hi Buddy
    Not disagreeing with your well thought/written article, but i do believe that the lady has already apologized.No public renouncing but apology, yes.
    Nevertheless, your point is clearly valid and makes sense.
    🙂

  3. I just don’t feel like I’m at home anymore. We locals are just living in Singapore, with so many guests coming in and now they’re treating us like pests.

    I have lost most of my pride and belonging for this red dot. What is there to be proud of of this nation?

    I’m just a kid and I’m just giving my two cents.

  4. I just don’t feel like I’m at home anymore. We locals are just living in Singapore, with so many guests coming in and now they’re treating us like pests.

    I don’t feel anymore pride and belonging for this red dot.

    I’m just a kid giving my two cents.

  5. I think part of the reason is that the Law might not be totally up to date on how to deal with social media and its abuses. This is the sort of thing that GP students can write essays about! Similarly, the Law isn’t quite ready for street art either, but for vandalism, well the rattan is all ready!

    • Hey Max,

      The question Jothie raised was “why cane vandals?” This is incongruous with the concept of punishment befitting the crime. Since no physical harm is inflicted on a person who commits vandalism, then they should not get caning. Jothie showed that this was in fact a law passed to prevent political propaganda from being displayed. That’s why it wasn’t well thought through.

      At least sticker lady and accomplice aren’t being charged with vandalism.

    • I think the issue is that in the past some bloggers have been charged under the sedition act for posting racist remarks. So it’s not as though the government didn’t know how to deal with “abuses of social media”. Amy Cheong could have been charged likewise and could have faced a jail term. If they want to throw the book at you, they’ll find a way to do it.

  6. I thought the Sticker Lady was convicted because the place where she stuck the sticker on was designed for the blind and handicapped alike. So the sticker actually negates the intended purpose of the design and may end up misleading them. I do support the creativity and intention behind it though. My inner voice said “Finally!” when I first saw the photo, HA.

    • I’ve seen the place where it was stuck. It doesn’t affect the handicapped at all. It especially doesn’t affect the blind. It isn’t misleading. It doesn’t affect the volume of sound from the assistance device.

      Moreover her charge is specific – no mention of affecting the handicapped.

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